This picture is great both because Mrs. D. is being friends with KB AND she’s giving the best death glare I’ve ever seen her give.

This picture is great both because Mrs. D. is being friends with KB AND she’s giving the best death glare I’ve ever seen her give.

You mean infrastructure like two-lane roads that aren’t wide enough for one lane and putting a stop sign at the bottom of a hilled on-ramp to the parkway don’t lead to vehicle safety? Added to the topography of a city built into a mountain? Get out.

colinmorgasms:

what if obama does the ice bucket challenge and nominates queen elizabeth

smithsonianlibraries:

mallhistories:

Today the National Zoo introduced two female American bison. The first bison in the custody of the Smithsonian arrived in the 1880s:

These American bison, also known as buffalo, were part of the Smithsonian’s Department of Living Animals. The Department was started by chief taxidermist William T. Hornaday, who was a spokesman for the conservation movement and very concerned about the possible extinction of American bison. The bison formed part of a collection of wild North American animals in a small sort of zoo in the yard behind the Smithsonian Castle in the late 1880s and early 1890s, before the establishment of the National Zoo.

Learn more about the bison, Hornaday, and more at Histories of the National Mall.

If you want to learn how the two new bison got their names, check out the Smithsonian Zoo’s Conservation Biology Institute’s all-bison-all-the-time site.

smithsonianlibraries:

mallhistories:

Today the National Zoo introduced two female American bison. The first bison in the custody of the Smithsonian arrived in the 1880s:

These American bison, also known as buffalo, were part of the Smithsonian’s Department of Living Animals. The Department was started by chief taxidermist William T. Hornaday, who was a spokesman for the conservation movement and very concerned about the possible extinction of American bison. The bison formed part of a collection of wild North American animals in a small sort of zoo in the yard behind the Smithsonian Castle in the late 1880s and early 1890s, before the establishment of the National Zoo.

Learn more about the bison, Hornaday, and more at Histories of the National Mall.

If you want to learn how the two new bison got their names, check out the Smithsonian Zoo’s Conservation Biology Institute’s all-bison-all-the-time site.

abbythenormalone:

fortheloveofneps:

marththebland:

I can’t believe this is what our president and vice president spend their time on. We’re in 15 trillion dollars of debt, and millions of people are homeless, and abortion is still legal, and instead of signing bills to fix these things our president is doing this. Well I’m glad you’re having fun, you fucking bitch. Fuck the United States. /rant

WAITNDO YOU THINK THISNIS A REAL THING????
THIS IS SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE OH MY GOD

THIS IS THE BEST POST EVER I’M CRYING 

whiskeydrinking-operating:

This is Chester. When I was in Afghanistan I got a care package from one of those “Adopt a Soldier” programs that lets families send care packages to service men and women who are deployed overseas. Anyway, I got this care package, and it came with the usual stuff: Baby wipes, crackers, peanut butter, the Dad threw in a pack of cigarettes, and there was some jerky. But there was also a little beanie baby gold fish and a hand written note from a 7 year old girl that said 
“Dear Soldier, (I wasn’t even mad)
I hope you are doing well. I’m sorry you have to miss thanksgiving with your family. This is my friend Chester. He keeps me safe from monsters, but I think you need him more than I do. I hope he keeps you safe from the monsters you’re fighting. Take good care of him for me”.

You bet your ass that little fish was in my pocket every time I went on patrol.

You’re crying.

whiskeydrinking-operating:

This is Chester. When I was in Afghanistan I got a care package from one of those “Adopt a Soldier” programs that lets families send care packages to service men and women who are deployed overseas. Anyway, I got this care package, and it came with the usual stuff: Baby wipes, crackers, peanut butter, the Dad threw in a pack of cigarettes, and there was some jerky. But there was also a little beanie baby gold fish and a hand written note from a 7 year old girl that said
“Dear Soldier, (I wasn’t even mad)
I hope you are doing well. I’m sorry you have to miss thanksgiving with your family. This is my friend Chester. He keeps me safe from monsters, but I think you need him more than I do. I hope he keeps you safe from the monsters you’re fighting. Take good care of him for me”.

You bet your ass that little fish was in my pocket every time I went on patrol.

You’re crying.

omgskr:

Me on dates.

andreakisasi:

jenniferalaine:

Should You Catcall Her?

Well done, Playboy.
At 19, I read a sentence that re-terraformed my head: “The level of matter in the universe has been constant since the Big Bang.”
In all the aeons we have lost nothing, we have gained nothing - not a speck, not a grain, not a breath. The universe is simply a sealed, twisting kaleidoscope that has reordered itself a trillion trillion trillion times over.
Each baby, then, is a unique collision - a cocktail, a remix - of all that has come before: made from molecules of Napoleon and stardust and comets and whale tooth; colloidal mercury and Cleopatra’s breath: and with the same darkness that is between the stars between, and inside, our own atoms.
When you know this, you suddenly see the crowded top deck of the bus, in the rain, as a miracle: this collection of people is by way of a starburst constellation. Families are bright, irregular-shaped nebulae. Finding a person you love is like galaxies colliding. We are all peculiar, unrepeatable, perambulating micro-universes - we have never been before and we will never be again. Oh God, the sheer exuberant, unlikely face of our existences. The honour of being alive. They will never be able to make you again. Don’t you dare waste a second of it thinking something better will happen when it ends. Don’t you dare.
Caitlin Moran (via scatteredandshining)

psychotherapy:

by Alex Williams

It was like one of those magical blind-date scenes out of a Hollywood rom-com, without the “rom.” I met Brian, a New York screenwriter, a few years ago through work, which led to dinner with our wives and friend chemistry that was instant and obvious.

We liked the same songs off Dylan’s “Blonde on Blonde,” the same lines from “Chinatown.” By the time the green curry shrimp had arrived, we were finishing each other’s sentences. Our wives were forced to cut in: “Hey, guys, want to come up for air?”

As Brian and his wife wandered off toward the No. 2 train afterward, it crossed my mind that he was the kind of guy who might have ended up a groomsman at my wedding if we had met in college.

That was four years ago. We’ve seen each other four times since. We are “friends,” but not quite friends. We keep trying to get over the hump, but life gets in the way.

Our story is not unusual. In your 30s and 40s, plenty of new people enter your life, through work, children’s play dates and, of course, Facebook. But actual close friends — the kind you make in college, the kind you call in a crisis — those are in shorter supply.

As people approach midlife, the days of youthful exploration, when life felt like one big blind date, are fading. Schedules compress, priorities change and people often become pickier in what they want in their friends.

No matter how many friends you make, a sense of fatalism can creep in: the period for making B.F.F.’s, the way you did in your teens or early 20s, is pretty much over. It’s time to resign yourself to situational friends: K.O.F.’s (kind of friends) — for now.

But often, people realize how much they have neglected to restock their pool of friends only when they encounter a big life event, like a move, say, or a divorce.

That thought struck Lisa Degliantoni, an educational fund-raising executive in Chicago, a few months ago when she was planning her 39th birthday party. After a move from New York to Evanston, Ill., she realized that she had 857 Facebook friends and 509 Twitter followers, but still did not know if she could fill her party’s invitation list. “I did an inventory of the phases of my life where I’ve managed to make the most friends, and it was definitely high school and my first job,” she said.

After a divorce in his 40s, Robert Glover, a psychotherapist in Bellevue, Wash., realized that his roster of friends had quietly atrophied for years as he focused on career and family. “All of a sudden, with your wife out of the picture, you realize you’re lonely,” said Dr. Glover, now 56. “I’d go to salsa lessons. Instead of trying to pick up the women, I’d introduce myself to the men: ‘Hey, let’s go get a drink.’ ”

In studies of peer groups, Laura L. Carstensen, a psychology professor who is the director of the Stanford Center on Longevity in California, observed that people tended to interact with fewer people as they moved toward midlife, but that they grew closer to the friends they already had.

Basically, she suggests, this is because people have an internal alarm clock that goes off at big life events, like turning 30. It reminds them that time horizons are shrinking, so it is a point to pull back on exploration and concentrate on the here and now. “You tend to focus on what is most emotionally important to you,” she said, “so you’re not interested in going to that cocktail party, you’re interested in spending time with your kids.”

As external conditions change, it becomes tougher to meet the three conditions that sociologists since the 1950s have considered crucial to making close friends: proximity; repeated, unplanned interactions; and a setting that encourages people to let their guard down and confide in each other, said Rebecca G. Adams, a professor of sociology and gerontology at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. This is why so many people meet their lifelong friends in college, she added…

(read the full article here)

wordpainting:

The Emmys 2014: Robin Williams Tribute (Highlight)

slaughterhouse90210:

“Is there nowhere in an American house where one may be by one’s self?”― Edith Wharton, The Age of Innocence

slaughterhouse90210:

“Is there nowhere in an American house where one may be by one’s self?”
― Edith Wharton,
The Age of Innocence